• How Ron Miscavige Dodges the Truth


    Obsessed with selling out his family with his “memoir,” Ron Miscavige refuses to own up to the real reasons his daughters are estranged from him.

    When Ron Miscavige abruptly left the Scientology religious order after nearly 27 years, the one thing his daughters, Denise and Lori, adamantly insisted upon was that he not move in with his namesake son, Ronnie, who had sexually abused them as young girls.

    But Ron ignored his daughters’ pleas. And no sooner had Ron unpacked his bags than Ronnie was arrested for soliciting prostitution in Hampton, Virginia. Ron covered this up from his family, and never called his daughters. He already knew how they felt. Everything they had warned Ron about his namesake son had been proven again.

    Ron’s daughters wrote letters to him laying out in detail why they were so enraged and how disappointed they were with his decision. His daughters also made known their exasperation with his horrific conduct as a father that they attempted to forgive for decades, an effort that finally proved futile when Ron repeatedly showed he didn’t deserve such kindness. Ron left his daughters’ letters unread, refusing to read even a word.

    Ron left his daughters’ letters unread, refusing to read even a word.

    When his daughters called Ron’s wife to explain their views, there was no acknowledgement or effort to understand. Just a click from hanging up the phone.

    ron miscavige sr. in ron miscavige jr’s house

    Ron Miscavige is running a scam by trying to blame everyone but himself for imploding his family.  

    The heart of Ron’s con is a sad, personal family matter grounded in his own irresponsible behavior that he is now shamelessly using to shill his “memoir.” To give himself cover to attack his son for money, Ron now tries to falsely cast his estrangement from his daughters as a religious issue.

    But it’s really just about money, nothing more and nothing less. Ron sees his own family as a moneymaking opportunity to exploit.

    But it’s really just about money, nothing more and nothing less. Ron sees his own family as a moneymaking opportunity to exploit. Which is why his so-called “memoir” is a fraud.

    The reality is that since Ron left the religious order in 2012, he has been engaged in a pattern of nonstop family extortions, shakedowns and even blackmail. Driven by his obsession with money, Ron now operates under the thumb of those he befriended when he moved in with his son Ronnie—miscreant individuals seeking to harass his family, and specifically his own daughter and her husband, in court and on the Internet. Ron simply doesn’t get that his daughters would be upset that their own father sided with their tormentors.

    What Ron covers up is that the real reason Denise and Lori do not wish to speak to him stems from Ron’s egregious failures as a father…

    What Ron covers up is that the real reason Denise and Lori do not wish to speak to him stems from Ron’s egregious failures as a father, which they forcefully articulated in a joint statement their lawyer sent to ABC News in late April. It read:

    We wish to have nothing to do with him. Now or ever again. This is personal. Religion has nothing to do with it. Our father has engaged in a pattern of physical and emotional abuse against us and our late mother throughout our lives. He continually has hurt and betrayed us and allied himself with others who have betrayed us and attempted to hurt us and our families.”

    As they further explained in chilling detail:

    “This is not rhetoric. These are facts. First, from our earliest memories, he beat our mother senseless, even before our very eyes, to the point where she had to flee to save her life. Second, even when we were small children, he beat us, whipped us with belt buckles, tied us up, and inflicted severe physical and emotional punishment for the slightest or imagined offenses. Third, he stood by while our oldest brother repeatedly raped us. He enabled and protected that son and even blamed us for his bestial acts. Fourth, he often abandoned us, albeit that was a relief from the torture we suffered at his hands.”

    “…he beat us, whipped us with belt buckles, tied us up, and inflicted severe physical and emotional punishment for the slightest or imagined offenses.

    Instead of taking responsibility for his actions and facing up to the severing of relations with his daughters that he caused, Ron scapegoats the religion and his younger son. For his part, Ron thinks it will get him media attention so he can sell more books. That’s because the hate-filled individuals he now befriends convinced him that he needs to lie to cover up for his own failures with his family.

    Ron scapegoats the religion and his younger son. For his part, Ron thinks it will get him media attention so he can sell more books.

    These “friends” are the same people who broke up their own families. One violently caused permanent damage to the arm and shoulder of his wife of 35 years, who required surgery and extensive physical therapy. He also deserted his two children. Another walked out on his wife of 26 years, allegedly to go Christmas shopping while she was ironing his shirts, and he never returned.

    To spread their lies, Ron now falsely claims that the catalyst for his writing a “memoir” came when his older daughter’s husband turned him and his second wife away when they showed up on their doorstep in Florida, obnoxiously making extortionistic demands.

    Adding insult to injury, prior to this ambush at the home of his daughter, Ron took the callous step of making arrangements to stay with an estranged ex-husband of this very daughter. Not coincidentally, that same ex-husband works for Betsy Steg, an attorney who is personally advising Ron on his book and who broke up the family of Ron’s younger daughter by having an affair with that daughter’s husband. Ron’s insensitivity hurt his daughters. Instead of recognizing what he did and apologizing, he was too self-absorbed and didn’t care.

    Instead of recognizing what he did and apologizing, he was too self-absorbed and didn’t care.

    Ron knew then that his daughters did not wish to see him when he showed up. He, not they, had cut off communications when, in 2012, he moved in with his namesake over their protests, knowing full well he would now be living with someone who had sexually abused both his daughters.  His melodramatic ambush at a daughter’s home, unannounced, was just a ruse to give him the excuse he needed to sell out his family with a “memoir.” Here’s just some of the evidence:

    • He didn’t write or phone in advance. Any normal father traveling a thousand miles would do so.
    • He arrived at night. In the dark.
    • Ron had his wife knock on the door while he stood back, hiding behind a tree in the shadows. Since they were not close, the daughter’s husband had no idea who Ron’s wife was, having never even met her. It was as if a total stranger had knocked on their door demanding to come inside.
    • By that time, Ron knew he had alienated his daughter and her husband because he had befriended the very people who were attacking them with frivolous litigation.

    When Ron emerged from the shadows, his daughter’s husband politely asked him to leave. (For the record, Ron’s daughter was not even home.) Told by Ron’s daughter’s husband that they do not want to associate with him because of his actions, Ron out of nowhere blurted out the extraordinary threat that if that was the case, he would write a book vilifying his younger son David. By any definition it was blackmail.

    It’s obvious that the entire ambush was staged in cahoots with his so-called “friends.” He wanted a “reason” to publish a false “memoir” so it would disguise his real motive, which was to profit from having the same last name as his famous son.

      He wanted a “reason” to publish a false “memoir” so it would disguise his real motive, which was to profit from having the same last name as his famous son.  

    It’s important to note that Ron Miscavige never had a bad thing to say about his son David before vilifying him for a buck in his false “memoir.” In fact, during the nearly 27 years he worked in the Church’s religious order he had nothing but praise for his son’s accomplishments, always expressing his personal pride in his achievements like a proud father.

    Of Scientology expansion, Ron once wrote: I never thought I would see this much expansion in my lifetime and I attribute this to my son.”

    Then there were the many messages of praise he sent about his personal experience serving in the religious order at the behest of his son, such as the time when Ron wrote, “Without a doubt, this is the greatest adventure I have ever undertaken,” and he expressed his thanks for his son’s “drive, determination and leadership.”

    Ron knows his “disconnection” tale is a lie. In fact, Ron used to remark to his daughters, “It wasn’t so bad growing up with me, was it?” And they thought why would he incessantly ask that question? He knew the answer. Growing up with him was a nightmare. 

    “It wasn’t so bad growing up with me, was it?” He knew the answer. Growing up with him was a nightmare.

    At the time, they didn’t answer the question because what kind of father has to ask that? It seemed he was oblivious. But when he kept saying it 10 years later, 20 years, 30 years and even 40 years after they’d grown up and moved out, it became obvious he knew. The only father who would ask such a question over and over for decades is one who knows deep down that he was the worst father in the world.

    Their answer to Ron’s question: “Yes—it was that bad. It couldn’t have been worse.”

    Ron Miscavige Sr.