• Danny Dunagin


    Security

    My name is Danny Dunagin. I’m a security officer here at Golden Era Productions. My capacity is, you know, security, the safety. Mostly safety and security of the… the staff that are here. It’s a beautiful facility. It’s a gorgeous studios. There are quite a few hundred staff that are here. I’ve been here—I’ve been privileged to be here and… and work with this, with the Church here for over thirty years as a security officer.

    And in my capacity I, you know, I… I help thousands of people. There’s, you know, people that I help on the road, you know, people that get hurt. Obviously we… we respond and help out, just as anybody would. But, you know, I… I have, I’ve received training.

    And what stands out in my mind, out of the thousands and thousands of people that I’ve actually helped over the years, in the community or here on staff, is the num—the… the tiny fraction of the… of people that have… that have crossed, you know, that I’ve crossed paths with that were unbelievably obnoxious. Just obnoxious. And I’m talking about Ron Miscavige.

    This particular person stood out in my memory as to how obnoxious he was and how, just how careless he was about other people’s feelings. Nobody else existed, in his universe. Only he existed. He was so obnoxious. And I’ll… I’ll give you something that actually illustrates that. You know, just so that you understand what it is that I’m talking about. Here’s just a…

    I… I was sitting in the booth one day. I was on duty, and all of a sudden I get a phone call, you know, on my personal cell phone from Ron’s wife. And they were driving in from town, you know, they were coming in to, in to work, right? And I was on duty already. And Becky was so frantic I could hardly understand her.

    But when I finally figured out what was going on, she said, “Yeah, Ron just got pulled over by the police and, and it looks like they’re gonna put him in handcuffs. And can you just please come do something?”

    I was… I… I was just aga—I’m like, “What did Ron do now? Wh-what… now what did he… what did he do?” Right? So I quickly got in my patrol truck. I… I drove out to see what had happened. The policeman, he actually recognized me, you know, from… because I’d worked with him on several traffic accidents in my capacity. And he waved me over and I said, “What’s—can I help? What did Ron do now?”

    And he said, “You’re not gonna believe this.” He said, “He was, you know, he was traveling through, you know, this small town here, blowing red lights, traveling over eighty miles an hour. We got several phone calls that he’d almost side-swiped, you know, people. And we just didn’t know what was going on.”

    “So I… I came out, I put my lights and sirens on. I’m like behind this guy for several miles, and he never pulled over! He… he acted oblivious! And by the time we got him to pull over, you know, he stepped out of the car and he’s like, ‘What’s happening?’ He was just, he was already belligerent. And what he said was, ‘Oh, oh okay. Well, why don’t you just hit me and then just let me go!’”

    I said, “Oh, no.” Okay. Well, I was worried—Ron, being who he is, and, you know, his—you know, I was just concerned. I’m like, “Well, can you just let me just take him home?” You know, “Or just write him a ticket and let me take him home so that he—you know, get him off your hands?” He’s like, “No, it’s gone way beyond that just with what he’s done, and I'm going to have to take him in to the police station.” So I'm like, “Okay. Well, I'll take care of his wife. You know, I'll make sure that they get home safely so you don't have to worry about that.” He's like, “Okay, good. I appreciate that.”

    So, you know, you’d think Ron would be a little bit, you know, grateful. Like after he gets home, you… you would’ve thought he would have just come up to me and said, “Hey, you know, I really appreciate your taking care of things and, you know, I… I really screwed up.” No. Ron wasn’t like that.