• Ron Miscavige • Telling the Truth Is Not His Specialty
    A recounting of the daily facts, actually.

    Mark Twain once wisely said, “I am an old man and have known a great many troubles, but most of them never happened.”

    Mark Twain once wisely said, “I am an old man and have known a great many troubles, but most of them never happened.”

    That statement well applies to Ron Miscavige. Unlike the tales Ron likes to tell, for more than 25 years Ron was well cared for, given constant attention and support, and virtually given “the run of the place” even though he was a trumpet player in the Church backup band. One would well ask why, but the answer speaks for itself: everyone wants to care for Ron, keep him happy, because of their appreciation of his younger son’s work in the Church. And boy did Ron take advantage of it.

    Italian pastry chef catering to Ron on his birthday.

    Ron Miscavige wanted a special schedule, claiming to need it due to his age, starting in his late 40s. He got it. He wanted special use of the newly built A-rated professional kitchen so he could make pizzelles (a favorite Italian cookie) or cook up one of his special meals, and he got it. When Ron asked for special care from the professionally trained mechanics for his Italian bike (a gift from his younger son) or his car (a gift from his younger son and two daughters for his 70th birthday), he got it.

    When Ron wasn’t driving into town to do the occasional errand, he’d be off to Palm Springs or Los Angeles for doctor appointments, as he had unlimited free health care and received VIP treatment from the medical liaison staffers.

    When Ron wasn’t driving into town to do the occasional errand, he’d be off to Palm Springs or Los Angeles for doctor appointments, as he had unlimited free health care and received VIP treatment from the medical liaison staffers.

    Then there was all the traveling Ron did. East Coast. London. Paris, Caribbean cruises. And he’d usually get one of the best ship cabins, lounge in the dining room for hours, enjoy four star meals, perhaps a stogie with dessert.

    Ask Ron and he’ll tell you about his favorite exercises. He kept log after log after log of his daily exercise routines. Many people don’t have time for exercise, but because of the care given Ron, he almost always did. He can’t deny it—he’ll tell you he has been doing some of the same exercises for the last 50 years!

    There were also those generous birthday and Christmas gifts from his younger son. Ron enjoyed those days, with a special dinner with his wife, as his logs and photographs confirm.

    Oh, Ron’s was a good life. A charmed life. And Ron took every advantage.

    Oh, Ron’s was a good life. A charmed life. And Ron took every advantage. It is so sad that he complains about his musical director, who only cared for Ron and was happy letting him do whatever he wanted. It’s doubly sad that Ron forgot how good his life was.

    Ron Miscavige’s Day-Timers show his day-to-day activities for six years, reflecting the ordinary life Ron lived in the Sea Organization, the Church’s religious order. Ron was a trumpet player in a Church band. He scored music, studied, traveled and performed. He drove to the doctor when he wasn’t taking vacations, the occasional day off or engaging in other excursions.

    Ron Miscavige’s Day-Timers show in excruciating detail his day-to-day activities for years, none of which even remotely involve “a great many troubles.” Instead, they reveal an ordinary life of a musician who drives to doctor appointments, goes shopping and takes days off for excursions and vacations.

    The Day-Timers show what Ron did for years was play music in a band and live a peaceful, mundane life. He took time off for vacations, drove off to go shopping, indulged in his passion to work out and even spent time in the property’s gourmet kitchen leisurely baking pizzelles.

    Here is a random sampling of a few days of these daily diaries revealing the ordinary life of Sea Organization member and musician Ron T. Miscavige:

    FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2006: Ron keeps records of his reps for his daily workout. Thanks to a regular schedule for Ron to exercise, he completes 9 chin-ups.
    FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 2007: As part of Ron’s daily activities, he drives to Palm Springs on an errand.
    TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2007: Ron’s flight to Tampa, via Las Vegas, to perform.
    TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 2008: On an otherwise routine day, Ron orders a new exercise book.
    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2010: Ron goes to study. He also schedules a trip to a doctor and plans to leave at 8:30 a.m. so he has plenty of time to drive to his destination—which he did often.
    FRIDAY, MAY 28, 2010: Due to Memorial Day traffic, Ron spent the day in Los Angeles.
      WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011: Ron’s 75th birthday. He notes his younger son (whom he refers to as “COB” as the staff and Scientologists respectfully and affectionately call him) gave Ron a Jupiter Pocket Trumpet for his birthday, the only item on Ron's birthday “wish list.” Ron would play the trumpet for strangers, boasting that his son gave it to him.
    FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 2011: Another routine day as a Gold musician included exercise, study and completing two music scores.

    Ron’s daily log of his activities, which revealed the life he enjoyed, is a far cry from the life he had before becoming a member of the religious order.

    Perhaps it would be interesting to read the daily logs of Ron Miscavige of those days, weeks and months leading up to his arrest for attempted rape. Though his younger son stepped in and cared for Ron then—as he always has—and thus helped Ron retain top lawyers who got the charges dismissed, the logs may tell a story quite different from what these logs reveal. Those logs would have shown a life of debauchery, wife-beating and questioning by the police in an attempted rape incident.

    Perhaps it would be interesting to read the daily logs of Ron Miscavige of those days, weeks and months leading up to his arrest for attempted rape… Those logs would have shown a life of debauchery, wife-beating and questioning by the police in an attempted rape incident.

    Fortunately for Ron, his son saved him from prison and insisted he join the religious order to live a more ethical life—a life where Ron got to play the instrument he loved, travel the world, be among friends and live peacefully—just what the Day-Timers show.

    Most people would think back joyfully at that time in one’s life. They wouldn’t be like Ron: a bitter, cantankerous old man who betrays their son and daughters because of the almighty buck. And they certainly wouldn’t be peddling lies in an anti-family crusade.