• Ron Miscavige: Headed for Prison Until His Son Saved Him


    In May 1985, a terrified and desperate Ron Miscavige turned to his son David for help. If David chose not to help, state prison loomed as Ron’s next stop. And yet despite saving his father’s life, Ron paid back his son David by spinning a web of lies and false accusations about him to try and make a buck. Ron’s bad character knows no boundaries.

    After a sex-crime victim picked Ron from a photo lineup, the police arrested and charged him with “criminal attempt at rape, indecent assault, simple assault, recklessly endangering, criminal trespass and burglary” for an attack on a woman at an apartment complex outside of Philadelphia.

    Staring at a future in prison, Ron knew that only his youngest son David could rescue him from his dire circumstances. David had spent the last decade dedicated to the Church and, as such, earned his place as the patriarch of the family. Despite David’s heavy workload handling the personal affairs of the Founder, David acted as a good son and helped his father by retaining highly qualified experienced criminal attorneys and helping with Ron’s criminal defense. Those efforts saved Ron from prison when the charges were dismissed.

    One would think such a gift of freedom from a son to a father would indebt the father to his son for life, but Ron Miscavige lacks even that basic trait of character: gratitude. Instead, in his “memoir” Ron pretends his arrest was no big deal and just a simple case of mistaken identity. But the facts show that Ron’s brush with prison was much closer than he suggests and his constant lying about the details shows he understands what a close call it was.

    The Church does not debate Ron’s guilt regarding these charges. But Ron has no excuse for downplaying and ignoring David’s efforts in ending a horrifying episode in Ron’s life that had him scared to death. He leaves out significant evidence contained in the publicly available police records. Most appalling is that Ron casts aside family ties and treats gratitude as something with an expiration date, to be exchanged for an ill-earned payoff. Milk spoils, but thanks for saving one from a stint in state prison and a lifetime of being labeled a felon and attempted rapist does not. And least not in a person of character.

    Is Ron delusional about the extent of his troubles or just a practiced con man?

    Consider his claim that the victim “only halfheartedly identified me in a photo lineup.” Contrast that to the verbatim account in the 1985 police report from the victim: “His features are so much alike and looks so close it’s almost freaky. It has been over seven months but number four [Ron] really looks like him.”    

    ronald miscavige rape arrest excerpt
    “His features are so much alike and looks so close it’s almost freaky. It has been over seven months but number four [Ron] really looks like him.”

    That doesn’t sound halfhearted to anyone but Ron. The victim further told police a harrowing account of being pushed by her assailant onto a bed after he lured her into an empty apartment she was showing to prospective renters. She further told of how he ripped open her blouse and scratched her face before she fought him off.

    Here is what detectives from the Upper Merion Township Police Department outside Philadelphia wrote in their report. For privacy reasons, the names of the victim and witness have been redacted:

    On the evening of October 9, 1984, after darkness, at approx. 20:00 hrs. [a woman] was working alone in the rental office of the Kingswood Apartment complex [in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania]. She noticed a car pull up in the front of the rental office. Shortly after seeing this car arrive a white male entered the rental office and enquired about renting an apartment. [The victim], who was on the phone at the time when the man entered, handed the man a brochure and asked him if he wanted to see a one bedroom or two bedroom apartment.

    She said the man seemed to be caught off guard by this question and, after looking at a sign which indicated the door to the “two bedroom” sample apartment, the man said that he wanted to see a two bedroom apartment. [The victim] directed him to the two bedroom sample and finished her phone conversation. She then joined the man in the sample apartment. [The victim] stated that the man did not say too much and commented very little about the apartment. As she turned away from the master bath and walked near the bed, the man pushed her back onto the bed, leaned over her, ripped open her blouse with both his hands and said, “I’m going to get you Cutie” or something similar. During the ensuing struggle she received scratches on her face. She managed to kick the man in the groin and he immediately ceased the attack and fled the scene.

    As the police report continues, similar suspicious events clearly involving Ron pursuant to the same modus operandi soon transpired in the same area:

    On January 21, 1985 at approx. 1500 hrs, [a separate female witness] was working in the rental office of the Gulph Mills Village apartments. At that time a white male entered the rental office and inquired about renting an apartment. When asked if he was interested in a one or two bedroom unit he answered that it did not matter. [The witness] became suspicious of the man because of this answer. She gave him some general information and offered to show him a sample apartment. While explaining the details of the apartments to the man [the witness] said he acted both disinterested and silly. The man declined to see the sample. He asked about her Saturday office hours and then left the office hurriedly. She stated that she felt very uneasy while speaking to this man because he never made eye contact with her but continually stared at her breast.

    4 door honda accord like Ron Miscavige’s
    1980 Honda, like the car Ron was driving at the time.
     

    On March 25, 1985 at approx. 1810 hrs. [the witness] was working in the Gulph Mills Village apartment rental office when this same man entered the office, walked directly to [her] desk and asked for directions but she was terrified and did not answer… and he left the office.

    According to police documents, the witness at the Gulph Mills Village complex wrote down details about the car (a 4-door cream colored Honda Accord) and the license plate, which exactly matched Ron Miscavige’s car. When Detective Deegan of the Upper Merion Police interviewed Ron he admitted that a) it was his car, b) he was a salesman and had made business calls to the Kingswood apartments where the assault had occurred and c) that he was in the rental office of Gulph Mills Village apartments in late March.

    Ron … admitted that a) it was his car, b) he was a salesman and had made business calls to the Kingswood apartments where the assault had occurred and c) that he was in the rental office of Gulph Mills Village apartments in late March.    

    Both women were shown a photo display of five different men. Both picked out Ron from the selection and stated he was the man who entered their rental offices, with the victim identifying him as the man who assaulted her. In Ron’s book, he admits, “They showed me a composite drawing of the suspect. It could only have been me. It looked so much like me that I could have posed for the picture.”

    In Ron’s book, he admits, “They showed me a composite drawing of the suspect. It could only have been me. It looked so much like me that I could have posed for the picture.”    

    The police descended in force upon his house with a search warrant and came in looking for evidence, including one brown men’s suit and a camel colored cloth coat. Ron’s daughters, who were in the area then, recall that he wore such a coat often but that the police mistakenly grabbed a similar one belonging to their mother, Loretta. (The woman Ron now admits he regularly beat for a decade.) Ron confesses in his book, “They found a tan topcoat that belonged to Loretta. If I put it on, the sleeves would have come halfway up my forearms. They took it as evidence anyway.” Ron omits that his daughters distinctly remember that he owned and wore a tan coat that most definitely did fit him.

    Ron called David in a panic over what would happen to him in jail. He believed that he would be sodomized and found hanging in a cell. Ron continued to feel that way years later. In a shameful and racist 2011 rant in which he recalled the incident in a voluntary taped interview:    

    ron miscavige sr.

    The first attorney we had, if we would have kept him I would be in jail now getting f----- up the ass by a n-----. I can tell you right now.

    (Click here to listen to the full, unedited and shocking audio clip

    When David acted to help Ron, a condition for that help was David’s insistence that Ron join the religious order so that Ron could “clean up his act” and finally lead a moral, ethical life. Ron had been leading an immoral life leading up to the arrest, and David knew that only a complete change and strict moral boundaries would keep Ron out of trouble.  So David insisted that if Ron escaped conviction, he would join the Sea Organization to keep his behavior in check. Ron had proved that he couldn’t be trusted to behave if left to his own devices.

    The dates tell the tale: On May 1st, Ron is interviewed by the police. On May 8th, Ron is arrested and the police conduct a search of his home. By the end of May the charges were dismissed thanks to David and the highly respected experienced attorneys he retained. June 10th, Ron drove cross-country to California, where he joined the religious order.

    As soon as Ron got off, he reported for duty, as ordered.

    As soon as Ron got off, he reported for duty, as ordered.

    But Ron’s book now spins it as, “For some time I had been considering joining the Sea Organization.” He knows that the truth is that David insisted Ron join so he would leave behind his life of debauchery.

    For the next 27 years Ron was afforded the opportunity to work in a Church band as a trumpet player, travel the world, thereby fulfilling his dream of playing music and performing for audiences. This was a far cry from the dissolute life of an itinerant cookware salesman in Pennsylvania. Ron lived and worked at the idyllic Golden Era Productions facility in Southern California, received strong moral support and largely stayed out of trouble.

    And yet in his latest hustle for money, Ron now rewrites history with his “memoir.” He admits in his book that his late wife Loretta believed he committed the crimes he was charged with in Pennsylvania: “‘Well,’ she said, ‘these days I am willing to believe anything.’”

    He admits in his book that his late wife Loretta believed he committed the crimes he was charged with in Pennsylvania: “‘Well,’ she said, ‘these days I am willing to believe anything.’”

    Ron also shows extraordinary insensitivity toward his late wife stemming from the attempted rape incident. Ron describes how he went ballistic at the police station when his wife mentioned the woman Ron had been having an affair with, claiming that she “was trying to help the police pin this rape charge on me! At that moment, I felt as though I had been thrown under the bus emotionally as well as physically.” He rants that her remark “could not have been more of a betrayal.” Shamelessly, Ron blames the victim of his betrayal of betraying him! Proof positive of the “Through the Looking Glass World” in which Ron lives. True is false; false is true; right is wrong and wrong is right!

    Other “facts” in Ron’s account are sloppy and suspect. As just one example, Ron in his book claims he was home watching the seventh game of the World Series on the night the attempted rape took place. The only problem is that 1984 World Series was concluded in five games when the Detroit Tigers finished off the San Diego Padres. So there was no seventh game.

    Ron in his book claims he was home watching the seventh game of the World Series on the night the attempted rape took place. The only problem is that 1984 World Series was concluded in five games when the Detroit Tigers finished off the San Diego Padres. So there was no seventh game.

    Ron not only tries to use the fictional seventh game of the World Series as his alibi, but in an early draft he went a step further by claiming Loretta watched the game with him. But when the facts were noted by the Church to his publisher, Ron took out mention of his late wife. What’s more, Ron’s version never made any sense. If his wife had been with him watching a baseball game occurring at the exact same time of the crime, she never would have made a statement suggesting she believed he did it, because she would have known he was innocent. What all this really shows is that Ron and his co-author, a venomous anti-Scientologist, make it up as they go along.

    In 2011, a reporter from the Philadelphia Daily News started poking around about Ron’s arrest so many years earlier. Ron began acting irrationally and irritated that the subject had come up again. Shortly after the article appeared in print, Ron abruptly took off from Golden Era Productions in what he now fabricates as his “escape.”

    The Church attempted to defend Ron in the article, just as his youngest son had defended him so many years previously. All Ron ever received from his son was support and defense to help him live out his life in peace. To this day, Ron has never told his son or the Church what really happened.

    It’s obvious that bringing up memories of his near miss with a prison sentence struck a nerve, both in the way he acted when the newspaper inquired about it and in his racist rant discussing it. Judging by how far Ron goes out of his way to deny it in his book, it still does.

    No matter, the indisputable fact is that Ron was convinced he would be imprisoned (and then be sodomized and found hanging in his cell). His son David is the person he turned to for help and, while thousands of miles away, David retained the best legal counsel in Philadelphia. Ron is a free man thanks to his son.

    Ron was convinced he would be imprisoned (and then be sodomized and found hanging in his cell). His son David is the person he turned to for help and, while thousands of miles away, David retained the best legal counsel in Philadelphia. Ron is a free man thanks to his son.

    Now he shows his “appreciation” by publishing a book defaming the son who saved him—just to make a buck. To Ron, loyalty is a one-way street.

    The bottom line is Ron’s life of debauchery and recklessness caught up with him and nearly landed him in prison. His son David saved him. Whether Ron wants to admit it or not now that he is vilifying his son for a buck, David’s compassion for his father rescued him from the horrors of prison.

    Any father would have felt that he owed his son big-time for saving his life, thanking his lucky stars each day that he had a son who came to his rescue. But not this father. If he were capable of shame, Ron would feel ashamed. Because he is not, he does what his bad character instructs: Lie, be disloyal, chase a buck. 

    But right-thinking people can have only one reaction: Shame on you Ron Miscavige!

    Here are the police reports:

    ron miscavige sr arrest doc page1


    ron miscavige sr arrest doc page2


    ron miscavige sr arrest doc page 3


    ron miscavige sr arrest doc page5


    ron miscavige sr arrest doc 2 page 1


    ron miscavige sr arrest doc 2 page 2


    ron miscavige sr arrest doc 2 page 3


    ron miscavige sr arrest doc 2 page 4


    ron miscavige sr arrest doc 2 page 5



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